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Posts Tagged ‘interior’

1brand

noun \ˈbrand\

: a category of products that are all made by a particular company and all have a particular name

: a particular kind or type of something

: a mark that is burned into the skin of an animal (such as a cow) to show who owns the animal

The world seems crazy about brands or branding. Not to mention the craving for the “named” brands over “no name” brands in a market place, the notion of brand, or branding, is deeply penetrating into our daily life.

Art world is one of the places where the notion of brand plays a powerful role. People seem to feel more trusting when there is a name attached to an object. Of course it is understood and even forgiven when old stuff doesn’t have a name (of designer, creator, producer, etc.). But when it comes to a modern era certain information is expected, like who made this, how he/she made this, why he/she made this, and so on. However, in reality not all modern objects can have a clear label attached to them. Are they, if they don’t have name with them, not noteworthy or less noteworthy?

Many eminent people and their works are recorded in the history. In many cases, however, people invert this logic. In other words, if there is no name left in the history it is not important. This is the premise that I want to re-evaluate.
There were so many creative minds and still are. The creativity is smeared into all creation, in different level, whether the artist is known or unknown. And at some point all creators have their names. It just that we don’t know it now, or just yet.

So this venue, the Book of Anonymous Design, is dedicated to the objects of “no name brands” that are underrated, under-appreciated, and sometimes forgotten. Do you want the name of artist? Do you need a brand to appreciate the beauty? Here it is; these are by “nemo.”

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For the past few days, for some reason, I’ve devoted this blog to British stuff: Elliott’s chairs, Salvage Hunters (Drew is British) and finally the one and only Anglepoise!

 

The first “Anglepoise “ was designed by the British automotive engineer George Carwardine (1887-1948) in 1932 and manufactured by Herbert Terry & Sons from 1934. In 1935, the original model was modified for domestic setting to the one now known as Model No. 1227.

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As a herald of task lighting, Anglepoise embodies the innovative concept of balancing weights with springs, cranks and levers. The constant-tension principle of human limbs applied to the basic structure of the lamp allows flexible repositioning and as a result the light remains highly stable and holds any position. It can literally afford almost all position in 3 dimensional space! The shade concentrates the beam on specific points without causing dazzle. This focused beam enables the lamp to consume less electricity, and thanks to this feature it was advertised as the best lamp for black outs during the war time. (A funny side note: it uses a French bayonet mount and bulb and I happened to get 4-5 of them from my last trip to Switzerland before I acquired Anglepoise. I am proudly saying that I am probably the only one in Korea who has the largest possession of bayonets.)

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Celebrating Anglepoise’s 75th anniversary Terry & Sons reissued the original design of Model No. 1227 in 2009 and it was honored by being placed on a Royal Mail Stamp commemorating British Design classics. I’ve never been into stamp collecting but would love to get my hands on one of those design stamps.

In fact, my first encounter with Anglepoise was with its new model: Giant 1227. Yes, it is gigantic!

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Anglepoise Giant1227

Although it is cute (well, big but cute) my heart still falls for the original Anglepoise for the creativity, ingenuity and human scale. But nonetheless congrats on the second wind of Anglepoise!

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In many cases (sadly, not always) there is a good reason why the classics are classic. I believe they still hold aesthetic value and sometimes quite decent monetary value. In other words, we can still decorate our homes with them despite the time that elapsed since their first creation.

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http://www.ekmodernkorea.com/cat102_en.html

PH series is with no doubt one of them. I just found a nice picture of it decorating a modern home from Ellie Decoration (Korea edition) No.10. I personally prefer PH4 3/4 because of the visual simplicity (see the another angel halo added to PH5!) and the practical reason. Since most homes don’t have such high ceiling as that of galleries the more simpler sister of PH5 would make more sense. But nonetheless, it’s nice to see a nice home furnished with nice lamps. Nice Nice Nice!

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