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Posts Tagged ‘70’s’

Biomorphic Sculpture, 1970's, Switzerland. Courtesy of Rayon Roskar.

Biomorphic Sculpture, 1970’s, Switzerland.
Courtesy of Rayon Roskar.

Steel Sculpture, 1970's, Switzerland. Courtesy of Lost City Arts.

Steel Sculpture, 1970’s, Switzerland.
Courtesy of Lost City Arts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pair of sculptures shares the same creative principle in large exploring the form of abstraction. They are also from the same period, 1970’s, and the same region, Geneva, Switzerland.

However, the juxtaposition of the two sculptures reveals a very interesting visual language of opposites; while the Steel Sculpture poses a solid shape piercing the space, refusing any traces of human hand (in a way this is what humans do, removing the trace of hand-made but seeking for a machine-like perfection in the modern world), the Biomorphic sculpture is burgeoning from inside into an organoid shape, the abstract form originating from an observation of nature. The traces of carving proudly but present the hand of creation.

Biomorphic Sculpture (detail), 1970's, Switzerland. Courtesy of Rayon Roskar.

Biomorphic Sculpture (detail), 1970’s, Switzerland.
Courtesy of Rayon Roskar.

 

Interestingly enough, the seemingly aggressive Steel Sculpture embraces the void within whereas its biomorphic counterpart holds solid mass.

In this case of these two sculptures, the antithetical nature and yet the creative principle within in turn ties them into a bigger idea of artistic creation.

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http://www.ekmodernkorea.com/cat129_en.html

Many visitors are surprised at this pair of English chairs sitting in the gallery for two reasons: they are in such nice condition considering the age (4-50 years) and the distance they traveled (England to who knows where to South Korea), and they are very low (in Koreans’ mind all “westerners” are tall and have long legs).

I’d like to add one more reason; in fact the first impression I got from these chairs (and fundamentally the reason why they are sitting in EK Modern waiting for the future owner) was that they looked quite Scandinavian. In a way it is true.

The chairs were made by the famous British aircraft manufacturer, Elliotts of Newbury. Elliott’s of Newbury was founded by Samuel Elliott in 1870 as “Elliott’s Moulding and Joinery Company Ltd.” It produced ammunition boxes during the World War I and aircraft components during the World War II. After the wars the company continued with aircraft production of which the most famous example is the EoN Olympia series. At the same time, it started furniture production after WWI and continued until it closed in 1970’s.  

So it is clear that the chairs are following the design of Scandinavian design, which reached its zenith during the 60’s and 70’s. Look at the sleek legs, reddish Teak color and scooped back! Among the Elliotts furniture, a few items show very very very strong influence of Danish modern. 

Some very nice people (thank you!!) again share the information which shows a couple of pages from Elliotts 1950’s catalogue.

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http://www.newbury.net/forum/m-1312629244/

They are probably too early to show the Scandinavian influence. But nonetheless it is an interesting primary source. 

What’s good about these late Elliotts chairs is that you can enjoy now highly sought-after Danish look at a very economical price. 🙂 I also found an amazing interior arrangement using a different type of Elliots chair. I am not posting the pics because I haven’t asked the blogger who posted her/his pictures yet. But it is good. so please do go check out!

http://fatcatbrussels.blogspot.kr/2012/09/dining-area-before-after.html 

 

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